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Getting Ready for a Peter Ferber Show

Peter Ferber’s annual winter show opens this Saturday at The Art Place. Everyone knows Peter is busily painting to get 13 brand new pieces ready for the big opening day, but everyone at The Art Place has also been working hard.

For this show, Peter’s work started as long ago as his college days! There is one painting of Cornwall, England, where he visited on a school trip. Photos of this trip sprouted the inspiration for this watercolor and ink line piece.

Peter used older photos as the base for several of his paintings in this show. One of these is titled “Robert’s Cove Departure”. In his research for creating the piece “Robert’s Cove Welcome” from his last show, he bumped into the scene that inspired this new work.

Robert’s Cove Welcome

I’ve heard people ask, “What is the first piece Peter started working on?” “What was the last he created?”. The answer to this is unsurprising for anyone who has followed Peter’s recent work–the cut paper. Peter began this elaborate piece at the start of his work for this show, and this piece will be one of the last to be finished! In his painting descriptions, Peter wrote, “In many ways, this has been the most challenging cut paper work I’ve done. It seems that each new one I do stretches the medium a bit more.” I personally have not seen this piece yet (it should arrive at The Art Place for framing tomorrow morning) but this is the work I am most excited to see.

Back at The Art Place, we have been planning the framing for weeks to make Peter’s paintings look their absolute best. (And sometimes we need to frame pieces that we’ve only seen a sketch for!) Thankfully Barbara has worked on so many of Peter’s works, that she can predict how the colors will come together to create the final piece.

Advertising for the show also happens weeks before the opening. Peter, Barbara and Emily work together in January to create the iconic postcard that some Ferber fans collect from each show! This year’s card is a little different because it features Squam lake–the unique subject of a few of this show’s paintings. This postcard is the backbone for most of the ads and articles that we create for the show.

My favorite part of preparation for Peter’s show is talking with the excited people who plan to attend the opening on the big day. Many people have been waiting to see a painting Peter has created featuring their own home or land. Many others simply are huge fans of Peter’s work and begin waiting in line in the cold in downtown Wolfeboro starting at 6am! We actually block up the windows so no one can see inside until the big moment at 9:30.

I also love the time spent Friday night before the opening, pulling out all the original paintings and finally getting to see them all as one unified show of works. We work after The Art Place’s normal hours (into the night) to arrange and hang the paintings. This often involves rearranging the entire gallery to make room for 13 new paintings! I’m sure if you stood outside the door, you could hear all of us hammering away on the walls.

If you are planning to attend Peter Ferber’s show this weekend, don’t hesitate to ask us any questions you may have about how these shows work–getting in line, purchasing a work, getting a hint about the painting you are interested in, etc. We are open 9:30-5 on Friday, and will open right at 9:30 again at Saturday will a gallery full of new original paintings. See you then!

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Peter Ferber Gallery Show opening February 18th

On Saturday, February 18, The Art Place in downtown Wolfeboro will hold its semi-annual Peter Ferber Gallery Show featuring new original paintings by local well-known artist Peter Ferber. The unveiling and artist’s reception will commence at 9:30 a.m. All are welcome to attend and meet the artist.  A snow date. if necessary, of Sunday, February 19th, has been set beginning at 11 a.m.

This morning when I looked out the window at the freshly fallen snow, I saw what I call a “Peter Ferber painting.” It’s an experience that I have quite often since I’ve graced the walls at the Art Place with Peter’s artwork.  In my mind’s eye, I can imagine Peter creating that scene in a painting.  He has the ability to capture dappled light as it gleans through trees, make perfect cloud formations, and create a wake from a wooden boat to the point where you think you can hear the motor.   These are all pictures that Peter is able to capture through his painting.  Basically, it is the essence of time standing still. Whatever moment in time, Peter Ferber captures it when he paints–it’s put down on paper, and it’s beauty has been preserved.  These snippets of images are a chance for me to step out of myself or what is going on in the world and breath in the beauty of a “Peter Ferber painting.”  For the rest of you who may or may not have experienced Peter’s paintings in your imagination, his artwork can be seen for real in this upcoming show at The Art Place located at 9 North Main Street, Wolfeboro, NH.

In referencing the upcoming show, Peter states, “As I look over the paintings taking shape for this next show, the common thread I find is that most are offshoots of other work–largely photo reference collected for other paintings that turn out to have merit of their own as a basis for a painting.  Last summer I did a large oil of the Robert’s Cove view.  I took a number of pictures focused on Quarter Mile Island.  The way I zoomed in on it from the hillside above created a wonderful composition.  There was also a sailboat moored next to it that was perfectly positioned as a center of interest, that hadn’t made it into the first painting.  Later, going down to the shore for a closer look at the island’s trees and ledge, a boat set out for an evening cruise.  The visual as it passed the island, and the sense of anticipation you feel heading out into the lake for a boat ride, launched another painting.

A few years ago in looking thru an old photo album in connection with work for Castle in the Clouds, I found a marvelous period image of the Kona Mansion boathouse.  Though it only included a portion of it, the detail was so wonderful I knew I needed to make use of it.  I’ve had it in my archive since, and it’s finally taken shape in two pieces–a watercolor and a cut paper assemblage.  It’s interesting to see the same subject approached in such different ways–one playing up the rich colors, the other focused solely on the textures, and the light and shadow.

From work on a poster project where I was trying to evoke the feel of an Arts and Crafts wood block print, I stumbled on the Tonalist style of painting which was going on during that same period.  The painterly style, rich, warm color schemes, and bold compositions have influenced my approach to several of the paintings in this show.  It was interesting to find how this style changed the way I looked at my subjects, and made me see possibilities where I might not have before.

What hasn’t changed is my focus on this area which everyday shows us more of its beauty.  There are many lovely atmospheric lake landscapes in this collection.  In addition to boathouses, there’s a porch, a Chris Craft, moonlight, snow, and even a Cornwall (England) cottage most of which were not my originally intended subjects, but got my attention the second time around.”

Since 1994 Peter Ferber has painted the official posters for the New England Chapter of the Antique and Classic Boat Society’s annual show, which also comes as highly collectable artist proofs.  Peter has exhibited in over 50 shows in New England and the Midwest.  He has been featured story a on WMUR’s New Hampshire Chronicles. More than 100 reproductions of his work have been made, including over 70 limited edition prints.

Peter Ferber’s Gallery Show at The Art Place  will be on display through March 4th, or as long as paintings are available.  The Art Place is the exclusive gallery for Peter Ferber’s original artwork, and produces most of his limited edition prints.  The Art Place is located at 9 North Main Street, downtown Wolfeboro, NH and is open year round.  For more information, please call 603 569-6159, or toll free 866 569-6159.

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Peter Ferber Gallery Show of New Original Artwork at The Art Place

On Saturday, February 18, The Art Place in downtown Wolfeboro will hold its semi-annual Peter Ferber Gallery Show featuring new original paintings by local well-known artist Peter Ferber. The unveiling and artist’s reception will commence at 9:30 a.m. All are welcome to attend and meet the artist. There is a snow date of Sunday, February 19th beginning at 11 a.m.

Barbara Gibbs owner of The Art Place talks about Peter’s artwork: “This morning when I looked out the window at the freshly fallen snow, I saw what I call a “Peter Ferber painting.” It’s an experience that I have quite often since I’ve graced the walls at the Art Place with Peter’s artwork.  In my mind’s eye, I can imagine Peter creating that scene in a painting.  He has the ability to capture dappled light as it gleams through trees, make perfect cloud formations, and create a wake from a wooden boat to the point where you think you can hear the motor.   These are all pictures that Peter is able to capture through his painting.  Basically, it is the essence of time standing still. Whatever moment in time, Peter Ferber captures it when he paints–it’s put down on paper, and its beauty has been preserved.  These snippets of images are a chance for me to step out of myself or what is going on in the world and breath in the beauty of a “Peter Ferber painting.”  For the rest of you who may or may not have experienced Peter’s paintings in your imagination, his artwork can be seen for real in this upcoming show at The Art Place located at 9 North Main Street, Wolfeboro, NH.

In referencing the upcoming show, Peter states, “As I look over the paintings taking shape for this next show, the common thread I find is that most are offshoots of other work–largely photo reference collected for other paintings that turn out to have merit of their own as a basis for a painting.  Last summer I did a large oil of the Robert’s Cove view.  I took a number of pictures focused on Quarter Mile Island.  The way I zoomed in on it from the hillside above created a wonderful composition.  There was also a sailboat moored next to it that was perfectly positioned as a center of interest, that hadn’t made it into the first painting.  Later, going down to the shore for a closer look at the island’s trees and ledge, a boat set out for an evening cruise.  The visual as it passed the island, and the sense of anticipation you feel heading out into the lake for a boat ride, launched another painting.

A few years ago in looking thru an old photo album in connection with work for Castle in the Clouds, I found a marvelous period image of the Kona Mansion boathouse.  Though it only included a portion of it, the detail was so wonderful I knew I needed to make use of it.  I’ve had it in my archive since, and it’s finally taken shape in two pieces–a watercolor and a cut paper assemblage.  It’s interesting to see the same subject approached in such different ways–one playing up the rich colors, the other focused solely on the textures, and the light and shadow.

From work on a poster project where I was trying to evoke the feel of an Arts and Crafts wood block print, I stumbled on the Tonalist style of painting which was going on during that same period.  The painterly style, rich, warm color schemes, and bold compositions have influenced my approach to several of the paintings in this show.  It was interesting to find how this style changed the way I looked at my subjects, and made me see possibilities where I might not have before.

What hasn’t changed is my focus on this area which everyday shows us more of its beauty.  There are many lovely atmospheric lake landscapes in this collection.  In addition to boathouses, there’s a porch, a Chris Craft, moonlight, snow, and even a Cornwall (England) cottage most of which were not my originally intended subjects, but got my attention the second time around.”

Since 1994 Peter Ferber has painted the official posters for the New England Chapter of the Antique and Classic Boat Society’s annual show, which also comes as highly collectible artist proofs.  Peter has exhibited in over 50 shows in New England and the Midwest.  He has been featured story a on WMUR’s New Hampshire Chronicles. More than 100 reproductions of his work have been made, including over 70 limited edition prints.

Peter Ferber’s Gallery Show at The Art Place  will be on display through March 4th, or as long as paintings are available.  The Art Place is the exclusive gallery for Peter Ferber’s original artwork, and produces most of his limited edition prints.  The Art Place is located at 9 North Main Street, downtown Wolfeboro, NH and is open year round.  For more information, please call 603 569-6159, or toll free 866 569-6159.

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The Art of Tim Campbell

Tim Campbell identifies with the term of “outsider art”, which was coined by an art critic in 1972 as an English synonym for “art brut”–French, meaning raw art or rough art.  The critic, Roger Cardinal, used this term to describe art created outside the boundaries of official culture.  The term “outsider art” is often applied more broadly to include self-taught or naive art makers.  Campbell’s work reflects his sharp sense of humor, and interest in primitive fork art as well as contemporary political and religious imagery.  His work covers a vast range of subjects, including North American birds, his “Animals as People” series, and folk-style map paintings.  He also loves to create caricature-like portraits, accentuating odd features and stretching proportions to fit the look he wants.  Tim says about his work, “I like anything that’s not right.  I don’t like perfect things.”

Goldfinch

His collection of maps includes one of  Lake Winnipesaukee with our own “Nessy” popping up out of the water.  Tim’s collection of birds includes a robin, cardinal, chickadee, goldfinch, as well as New Hampshire’s own purple Finch. Of course, he has added a loon or two to the collection. This series demonstrate a more specific and detailed approach to his art.  He paints his native New Hampshire fish series in a more Americana style. Having a birthday on October 31st,Tim has made a lot of images relating to the Halloween holiday.  He has an entire series of popular Halloween scenes and images that he has made into cards.  These and other holiday cards go over  very well.  Tim states, “My work is both thought provoking and humorous.   It has taken Folk Art to a new level.”  Tim also creates sculptural pieces. “They are created entirely from recycled wood and metal. Using vintage pieces for my painted furniture gives them a primitive appearance. Each piece is unique and one-of-a-kind.”             

Lake Winnipesaukee

Tim was born in Keene New Hampshire, and decided to be an artist in second grade when he beat even high schoolers in an art competition. Later on, Campbell actually failed an art class in high school, but didn’t let it kill his passion. Tim’s art career has flourished since then, and his work can be found in galleries around the United States and internationally. In 2010, Campbell was honored with the highest award as a traditional artisan in “The Early American Life” magazine’s Directory of Traditional American Crafts.

Campbell works in his studio in Keene, New Hampshire, with his dog Otis, a Jack Russell terrier who keeps him company while he works, and serves as a muse for this whimsical self-taught artist.

NH Pen and ink Artist Gene Matras

I have admired Gene Matras’s pen and ink artwork ever since I saw him demonstrating at Artist in the Park in Wolfeboro in the mid 80’s.  The piece he was working on at that time was of a farm perched on top of a hill.  In black and white he captured all the beauty of nature as if he were producing a painting instead of a pen and ink drawing, as if there were a brush in his hand instead of a pen.  His skill showed through in each flowing stroke and the scene became alive.  I thought, what an unbelievable patient person he must be to produce such intricate detailed work.   Fascinated, I then understood why a crowd of people always seems to surround him at his shows.

Gene Matras is an artist who has been blessed with a talent which he has enjoyed for years. The Matras family came to America from Europe in 1960. Born in a log cabin on a farm in Poland during the darkest days of the “Iron Curtain,” Gene was nine years old when he arrived in Manchester, NH with his family. With initial encouragement from his mother, Gene has been drawing since early childhood in the Old Country, and has pursued his craft ever since.

Living in a rural environment in Poland he drew scenes which were familiar to him. Horses, cows, trees, and barns were always his favorite subjects.  When he became a New Hampshire-man he continued with similar themes but with a New England flavor. He has tried other media, but chose pen and ink, which he has developed into an interesting technique. Drawing and not painting was always his passion even in the Old Country.  He loves the stark contrast of black and white and its clarity. Inspired by natural scenes, wildlife, farms, and a variety of other rural subjects, he concludes that he does not have enough time to put it all on paper.

Living in Pittsfield, NH with his wife where they raised five children, he is surrounded by endless subject. Gene has not always created art as his career. As a young man, he worked at various jobs until he could get on his feet with his art. Gene went to a vocational college in Manchester for a year to learn the welding trade, but when the instructor saw his artwork, he told him to get out of the school and do art seriously. Gene did just that, and as time went on, Gene became more well-known. His art is now collected by many people.

Matras’ prints are produced from his original drawings by an offset lithography process. Gene sells his art at shows throughout New England and has acquired much recognition in the area. His prints are also collected abroad.  Gene has a very busy schedule, showing his artwork at various shows, festivals, fairs and events,  as well as art galleries.

Holiday Art Walk with Madelyn Albee

Saturday, December 10 from 5 to 8 p.m. Wolfeboro will be having a special holiday ART WALK. Several galleries in town will be open and present various activities and provide refreshments for this event.  Wolfeboro artist Madelyn Albee has been displaying at The Art Place for many years. She will be the featured artist at The Art Place.  Her artwork reflects the two different locations that she lives in and loves.  Spending her winters in her native Lunenburg, and summers in Wolfeboro, Madelyn offers spontaneous paintings that are varied in subject and medium.

All are welcome to come meet Madelyn at The Art Place on Saturday, December 10th  from 5 to 8pm.  Also on display at The Art Place for the December 10th ART WALK will be a sampling of sculptural work in forged steel by  Michael Connolly and hand made jewelry with semi precious stones by Mary Connolly.

Local vocalist and performer Laurie Jones will be making the rounds at The Art Place, The Kalled Gallery and Sandy Martin Gallery with Christmas carols and music to add to all the Holiday merriment!

The Governor Wentworth Arts Council is sponsoring the Wolfeboro’s ART WALK.  This self-guided FREE tour of galleries and arts locations are within the downtown corridor of Main Street (Rt.28).

Pick up a FREE informational Rack Card at The Art Place or the Wolfeboro Chamber of Commerce, which lists contact information and a map of all the participants. This will be the last ART WALK for this year, so come help us celebrate the Holidays!

Madelyn Albee

“People don’t always realize the fact that the Sun doesn’t stand still and this is a difficulty for a Plein Air Painter!” The Art Place’s featured artist: Madelyn Albee describes what a Plein Air painting venture is like for her. Well-traveled artist Madelyn is no stranger to the challenges and joy of painting outside. She meets twice a week with two different local painting groups. Each group is about 8 to 10 artist from Wolfeboro, Tuftonboro and Brookfield, New Hampshire.  They work together to choose and get to a location, but paint individually while they are there. “It’s challenging to interpret a place in two hours, and it’s fun!” she says with a smile.

When Madelyn first arrives at location she thinks about in which medium she would like to create the scene. For her this could be watercolor, oils, pastels as she is fluid in many different medias. “We don’t talk while we are painting, we set up and deal with the elements; it could be windy, mosquito-y, hilly, the shadows are constantly moving…”   (that dang moving sun!)  Madelyn says that although this planning, prep and set up is complicated, after doing it for so many years it is second nature, and each of the decisions she makes are rather intuitive. An added benefit, Madelyn states, is the fellow artist community that she has enjoyed over the past 10 years. Occasionally the group will travel to a museum or exhibit.

Loons in Moultonborough

Loons in Moultonborough by Madelyn Albee

Madelyn’s artwork depicts the two  landscapes that she knows very well and lives in: painting on location summers in New Hampshire and winters in Lunenburg, Nova Scotia. Her native Lunenburg is often depicted in lone boat scenes set in rugged coves, or brightly colored sails against a misty harbor. Paintings of Wolfeboro often include architectural detailing of New England homes, weathered rowboats set along the shore of Lake Wentworth, or loons collaged within the texture of a local map (shown above). The mood of the day is apparent in the images she creates, Madelyn’s confident brush strokes show a mastery of the elements and media.  Her intuitive sensitive response to that experience gives the viewer a chance to be there with her.

Meet the artist Madelyn Albee at The Art Place on Saturday, December 10th during The Wolfeboro Art Walk from 5 to 8 pm.

Castle Paintings

If you are a New Hampshire local, you most certainly have heard of the little gem–Castle in the Clouds–in Moultonborough, New Hampshire. This extravagant home was built in 1914 perched in the Ossipee Mountain Range. It’s famous for its lush views overlooking Lake Winnipesaukee and its lavish interior. Beloved artist Peter Ferber created a series of paintings depicting the Castle. The Art Place recently refreshed its stock of these iconic prints, which are very popular with locals, or for couples who are married at the Castle! Wedding season is a popular time to purchase these prints, but they are stunning all year round. You can view all of these prints here.

Castle Above the Clouds

Castle Above the Clouds

Peter Ferber documented his work on this series of paintings through small essays that go with each piece. One aspect of the Castle that he worked to convey was the rugged environment that surrounds the safe and civilized building. This can be seen in my favorite piece of the series–Castle Above the Clouds. In this painting, the large Castle seems minuscule compared to the view of the lake and surrounding mountains.

Peter also used unique perspectives to create these pieces. In Eye of the Castle, he stood on a 14-foot ladder to get just the right angle and view of reflections in the upper window. And The Corner Pocket captures so much of the architecture and feeling of the Castle and the surrounding landscape with just a tiny view of the corner of a room.

The Corner Pocket

The Corner Pocket

The Castle series also highlights several painting styles that Peter is fluent in. Tea Time at the Castle is a wonderful example of Peter’s detailed watercolor work. The tiny lacework and precise reflections in the silver tea set are flawlessly executed. Peter got to experiment with painting new kinds of intricate details in this series of paintings–the shiny car in Winged Visitor, a newspaper in In the Wind, and another lace tablecloth in Sun Settings!

The Gatekeeper’s cottage and Pergola Perch are reminiscent of an old English country scene. The brown oil wash softens the background of these images and allows the landscape to delicately emerge from the background, leaving plenty of space for the imagination to “fill in the gaps”. Another oil piece–Castle Hues–takes this a step further. Although this painting is created with acrylics, Peter’s depth of hues is similar to his oil works; the clear blue of the distant mountains is a striking contrast to the earthy autumn trees in the foreground.

The Castle in the Clouds series is a gorgeous collection of works, highlighting local artist Peter Ferber’s artistic talents. Each painting expresses this New England landmark in a slightly different voice, and together they truly bring the Castle in the Clouds to life. Although their summer season is over, the Castle is still open to visitors, and many enjoy this time of year for the special Christmas at the Castle events. After seeing the Castle, Peter’s art prints may feel even more alive to you, as the memory of a visit adds further color and feeling to these vivid pieces.

What is a Certified Picture Framer?

When you bring a piece of artwork into a shop to be framed, it is more important than you may think to be sure your work is being taken care of by a certified picture framer (or CPF). The Professional Picture Framer’s Association (PPFA) has created a rigorous exam to help framers prove their professionalism, techniques and overall standard for excellence that qualifies them as a CPF.

“The process of studying was where the most benefit came.” – Harry Gaston, CPF

emilyscholarship

Emily was awarded the Warshawer Certified Picture Framers’ scholarship.

In order to take the CPF exam, a framer must have hands-on experience with conservation techniques as well as study a long list of framing literature. I am currently working on attaining my own CPF designation, and was recently honored with the Warshawer Certified Picture Framers’ scholarship! This award is given by the New England chapter of PPFA, and aids in taking the CPF exam. I have begun studying for the test and can already see the results of this hard work in my relationship with customers and the artwork that they bring in to The Art Place.

But why is trusting your artwork with a CPF so important? CPFs understand how to best keep your artwork with high monetary or (more importantly) high sentimental value safe from tears, wrinkles, acid burn, mold and mildew, staining, fading, and so much more. They know how to frame artwork in a reversible way; with conservation framing, the piece can be completely removed from the frame and matting without any change or harm to the work. A CPF framer can be trusted to keep your work safe, and explain to you the pros and cons of different framing techniques, and how they can protect your work.

A CPF framer also studies how to create a visually pleasing piece; they can create a striking design that complements the artwork and reflects a customer’s unique vision. At The Art Place, we work hard to make framing choices that enhance the work being framed, instead of distracting the eye and creating “visual clutter”. A CPF framer is also fluent in a wide variety of mats, frames, and other decorative elements that can add polish and finesse to the framing design. For example, The Art Place has over 4,000 moulding samples to choose from, as well as an array of mats from various shades of white to vibrant colors and even fabrics and textures.

Barbara Gibbs, owner of The Art Place, and Betty Kanca, mat cutting specialist, both have CPF designations. This sets our shop apart from others in a very unique way. All our employees are trained under a CPF standard and can be trusted to protect your artwork and frame it safely and with style!

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Walter and Kathy put together an oversized frame for a custom framing job.

framingwithvalerie

Barbara measures a fabric piece by artist Valerie Schurer Christle to be framed.

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The Art Place staff (excluding Walter) with local artist Peter Ferber from left to right: Emily Marsh, Corina Willette, Barbara Gibbs, artist Peter Ferber, Katherine Tremblay, and Betty Kanca.

Food for Thought

When we started hanging the work for Jan Croteau’s show Food for Thought, people immediately began coming in and commenting on the festive looking fruits and vegetables. We also got excited about the titles and playful essays that went with Jan’s work. As we moved the artwork around in different placements on the wall, we even started laughing at our accidental jokes. “What if we sandwich the apples?” “I feel those two are going to sell as a pair.”

jans-openingI think everyone who attended the show can agree; Jan’s work reflects a strong sense of playfulness, honestly, and gratitude for nature. Jan writes about her passion for gardening, art and life with her inspiring essays that accompany each piece. As an artist and writer, Jan sends off each painting with a gift of a story. This is what makes her work so unique and personal. You can immediately find words to connect to the artwork, even if you are not a regular gallery-goer.

I had a lot of fun reading some of these stories as I created tags for Jan’s work. One of my favorites was about her annual birthday request for artichokes for dinner! (I have an almost identical story myself!) Jan brings humor into her work through these short essays and sometimes even the title itself! A painting of grapes is laughingly called, “Not Even Enough to Make a Scant Teaspoon of Jelly”.

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The Ripe Time by Jan Helling Croteau

Jan also surprises her viewers (and readers) with some thought-provoking messages that you wouldn’t expect to find accompanying bright and lively still life paintings. The pear painting we used for our postcards comes with an essay where Jan quotes Ralph Waldo Emerson: “There are only ten minutes in the life of a pear when it’s perfect to eat.” Not only is this a painting that makes you pause to breathe in the dynamic colors and textures of the visual image, but also a piece that makes you stop to think about appreciating life itself and the precious quiet moments that Jan highlights in her writing.

From the first impact of these glowing paintings on the wall, to reading the poetic and inspiring stories that Jan has skillfully crafted, Food For Thought is a show you do not want to miss! Her work will be on display until October 22 during normal gallery hours. (Monday-Saturday 9:30-5)